Consulting – Everybody’s Doing It, Should You?

00أخبارنا, اخر المقالات مارس, 16

By Marv Dumon

Management consultants solve problems. They are the hired guns brought in to assess the business operations of an organization looking for ways to improve efficiency and cut costs. They then bring these solutions to management – usually in PowerPoint form. Corporate managers, always sniffing around for new ways to unlock shareholder value, use consultants to improve the way a company does business. Read on to learn more about management consulting, what the job entails and how consulting might not be the shortcut to the executive suite that many assume it is. (For an overview of careers available in the world of business, see Finding Your Place In The Financial Industry.)

Types of Consultants
Consultants may be employed either internally within an organization, or externally through the offerings of a professional services firm.

  • External consultants must have a diverse set of skills. They never know what company they could be working for next, and so the deeper their range of experience, the better. Many of the large, recognized consulting firms provide best-in-class training to include methodologies, analytical techniques, change agent values, and presentation skills that give the consultant the critical problem solving skills and leadership traits necessary for upward career movement.
  • Internal consultants, however, are more inclined to develop deep and expert knowledge of their particular industry, and have more intimate knowledge and insight into how a particular company runs. They also have a historical perspective on the business, allowing them to quickly identify and cut through the internal politics often associated with organizational change.

To read more visit:

http://www.investopedia.com/articles/financialcareers/08/management-consulting.asp?header_alt=a

Can Management Consulting Help Small Firms Grow?

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By Annie Duflo & Dean Karlan Summer 2012

Should we assume that small enterprises in developing countries are lacking in business skills—and that guidance and training will improve these businesses? Economic theory says that firms do as much as possible to maximize profits—including paying for advice from management consultants. In developing countries, interventions ranging from quick lectures during microcredit meetings to extended engagements with international consulting firms aim to improve management practices. These interventions presume that the existing management must be missing something. And whenever there is a ton of activity, questionable data, and competing theories, researchers often try to fill the knowledge gap. We want to know: What is all this interventionist effort for? Can mere advice really help these enterprises run better, earn more money, and create more jobs—and, if so, why?

To read more visit:

http://ssir.org/articles/entry/can_management_consulting_help_small_firms_grow

Where the Growth Is in Management Consulting

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By Ira Sager June 13, 2013


Good news for U.S. management consultants: An overwhelming percentage of clients plan to keep hiring them.

Over the next 12 months, 82 percent of the U.S. clients surveyed by market researcher Source Information Services say they won’t cut the amount they spend on outside help. And nearly half, 42 percent, plan to bring in even more consultants, while 5 percent expect to boost their spending on consultants by more than 50 percent.

To read more visit:

http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/articles/2013-06-13/where-the-growth-is-in-management-consulting

?Consulting – Everybody’s Doing It, Should You

00اخر المقالاتTags: , , , , , , مارس, 16

By Marv Dumon

Management consultants solve problems. They are the hired guns brought in to assess the business operations of an organization looking for ways to improve efficiency and cut costs. They then bring these solutions to management – usually in PowerPoint form. Corporate managers, always sniffing around for new ways to unlock shareholder value, use consultants to improve the way a company does business. Read on to learn more about management consulting, what the job entails and how consulting might not be the shortcut to the executive suite that many assume it is. (For an overview of careers available in the world of business, see Finding Your Place In The Financial Industry.)

Types of Consultants
Consultants may be employed either internally within an organization, or externally through the offerings of a professional services firm.

  • External consultants must have a diverse set of skills. They never know what company they could be working for next, and so the deeper their range of experience, the better. Many of the large, recognized consulting firms provide best-in-class training to include methodologies, analytical techniques, change agent values, and presentation skills that give the consultant the critical problem solving skills and leadership traits necessary for upward career movement.
  • Internal consultants, however, are more inclined to develop deep and expert knowledge of their particular industry, and have more intimate knowledge and insight into how a particular company runs. They also have a historical perspective on the business, allowing them to quickly identify and cut through the internal politics often associated with organizational change.

To read more visit:

http://www.investopedia.com/articles/financialcareers/08/management-consulting.asp?header_alt=a

?Can Management Consulting Help Small Firms Grow

00اخر المقالاتTags: , , , مارس, 16

By Annie Duflo & Dean Karlan Summer 2012

Should we assume that small enterprises in developing countries are lacking in business skills—and that guidance and training will improve these businesses? Economic theory says that firms do as much as possible to maximize profits—including paying for advice from management consultants. In developing countries, interventions ranging from quick lectures during microcredit meetings to extended engagements with international consulting firms aim to improve management practices. These interventions presume that the existing management must be missing something. And whenever there is a ton of activity, questionable data, and competing theories, researchers often try to fill the knowledge gap. We want to know: What is all this interventionist effort for? Can mere advice really help these enterprises run better, earn more money, and create more jobs—and, if so, why?

To read more visit:

http://ssir.org/articles/entry/can_management_consulting_help_small_firms_grow